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Opened
2008

Artspace Hiawatha Lofts

Encore in the Emerald City

843 Hiawatha Place S., Seattle, WA, 98144

Exterior

Exterior

Cafe

Gallery

Interior

Commercial Spaces

Dance Class

Grand opening

Recording Studio Resident

Tabs

Overview

The resounding success of the Tashiro Kaplan Artist Lofts whetted Seattle’s appetite for a second Artspace live/work project. The result was the Artspace Hiawatha Lofts, a 61-unit building in the Jackson Place neighborhood on the southern fringe of downtown Seattle and just a block from the light rail line. Built at a cost of $17.1 million, the Hiawatha is a four-story building with an expansive exterior courtyard and a large community room that accommodates a variety of uses, including performances and lecture/demonstrations by Hiawatha tenants.

Designed to recall the industrial buildings that formerly dominated the northern end of the Rainier Valley, it has large windows, high ceilings and durable surfaces that accommodate a wide variety of creative uses. It has 4,975 square feet of ground floor commercial space facing Hiawatha Place; among the tenants are Artspace’s Seattle office, Café Weekend and My World Dance & Fitness. The Hiawatha meets the Seattle Office of Housing’s SeaGreen Standards — equivalent to LEED certification — for energy efficiency.

Located a block from the proposed east link light rail line scheduled for completion in 2020, and a short walk from Seattle’s lively International District, the Hiawatha is a welcome addition to a neighborhood with many cultural assets, including the Pratt Fine Arts Center, home to glass-blowers, sculptors, jewelers and printmakers; the Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center; and the Japanese Cultural and Community Center. 

Development Cost

$17.1 million

Architect

SMR Architects

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Hiawatha Kids
About the Neighborhood
Jackson Place is a vibrant, culturally diverse residential neighborhood located southeast of downtown Seattle. It is walking distance from Pioneer Square, the stadium district, and Lake Washington. The area has historically been working class, and from the 1920s through 1950s was part of Seattle’s vibrant jazz scene. Today it is the site of several schools, churches, and small and large businesses, as well as many single family homes, apartments, and town houses.
Our Thanks to...

FINANCING

City of Seattle Office of Housing, 
2002 Housing Levy

Impact Capital National Equity Fund
U.S. Bancorp

Washington State CTED Housing Trust Fund

Washington State Housing Finance Commission

FUNDERS

4Culture

Building for the Arts

The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation

The Seattle Foundation

U.S. Bancorp Foundation

Washington Mutual Foundation